Minted Holiday Playbook for Artist Stores 2015

We designed the Holiday Playbook to teach artists how to better market, sell, and merchandise their work during the winter holiday season, but the advice can be applied for other seasons as well. The following is a list of educational articles featuring advice from Minted leaders, external experts, and top talent in the Minted community.

Tips & Advice on Julep

More Resources for Building Your Minted Artist Store

Stay tuned for examples of stellar Stores, such as Carrie O’Neal’s Minted Artist Store.

What is a Minted Artist Store?

We’re glad you asked. Artist Stores are relatively new to Minted.com, the design marketplace connecting consumers with the world’s best artists to create something one of a kind.

All artists who win a Minted Design Challenge automatically win a Store.

The benefits of Minted Artist Stores:

  • Focus on what you love—we’ll take care of the rest. Use Minted’s world-class manufacturing and fulfillment platform to produce your art, stationery, and home decor creations.

  • In addition to your Challenge-winning products, you can self-launch non-custom products to your Store, and we handle the printing, framing, shipping, etc.

  • Build a branded presence on Minted to showcase your work and promote your personalized URL via your social media and other marketing materials.

  • When you win Challenges, your winning product will be displayed in the main Minted assortment and your name will be linked to your new Store. Your Store will automatically contain your winning products and you can also self-launch as many other products as you like. Note that your self-launch products will not appear in the main Minted assortment.

Learn more about Minted Artist Stores and self-launching products, including art prints, stationery, fabric, and notebooks.

 

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Who is your biggest creative influence?

Friends, family, strangers, enemies, teachers, other artists. There are so many people who inspire artists—and sometimes without consciously realizing it. For this edition of #WhatInspiresMe, we asked Minted artists Naomi Ernest, Melissa Egan of pistols, and Alexandra Dzh to tell us who inspires them most.

Naomi Ernest
Ann Arbor, Michigan

My main sources of inspiration begin with my family. Growing up, my parents were both artists-on-the-side. By example, they instilled in me the idea that art is an everyday part of life. These days, my five kids are daily reminders of the importance of the creative process; their blithe, uninhibited approach is evident every time I watch them.

Recently I’ve also been reconnecting to my family history, creating work as homage to my copper mining ancestors and their life in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. And, of course, a passion for my local environment is always evident—the lakes, landscapes, and resources of my home state of Michigan provide constant connection and inspiration for colors, textures, and themes in my work.

Drift” by Naomi Ernest

December – Turquoise” by Naomi Ernest


Melissa Egan of Pistols
Portland, Oregon

One of my biggest creative influences is my husband, John. He’s a brilliant painter, curator, and craftsman who makes everything from furniture to movie props. He’s taught me so much about the importance of taking your time to make something right, paying attention to details, and staying true to your personal aesthetic instead of only following trends.

Gilded Trees” by pistols

Dipped Feathers” by pistols


Alexandra Dzh
Vienna, Austria

There are a lot of people who inspire me, but one of the biggest creative influences is Austrian illustrator Lisbeth Zwerger. In my opinion, the charm of her illustrations lies in her delicate watercolor style, the diversity and strength of her colors, her great perception for detail. Lisbeth’s delightful and lyrical pictures always serve me as powerful source of inspiration.

Flowers Everywhere” by Alexandra Dzh

Bouquet” by Alexandra Dzh


Who is your biggest creative influence? Share your answer in Comments below and on Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter with the hashtag #WhatInspiresMe. We feature some of our favorite social shares in our Minted Fine Arts newsletter.

Need a quick creative pick-me-up? Read Minted artists’ solutions here.

Published September 28, 2015 • Learn how to become a Minted artist here.

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Top 10 Tips for Curating Your Minted Artist Store

There’s an art to curation, and it’s about more than merely placing art and designs where they look best.

When it comes to successfully organizing an online storefront, one of the most important things you can do is put yourself in the consumer’s shoes. Ask yourself, “What are consumers looking for?” “How can I make a good first impression?” and “What’s the best way for me to position my product offerings?”

Minted Artist Store Merchandising Tools allow artists to fully curate their Minted Artist Stores. You can spotlight Featured Products, create custom sections, and mix and match products by changing the order in which they’re displayed.

If you’re ready for curation advice and strategy, you’ve come to the right place. For technical instructions on using Merchandising Tools, read our “How can I curate my Store?” FAQ and watch this instructional video.

1. Identify Your Goals
Defining your goals will help you develop a business and marketing strategy—and asking yourself questions is a good way to get your thoughts on paper (or, on screen). For example, do you want to position your top-selling products front and center? Would you like consumers to view your Christmas and Hannukah products during the holiday shopping season? Do you want to rebrand yourself with a new creative direction via your self-launch products? Or perhaps you’d like to draw attention to your latest Minted Design Challenge–winning designs?

Whatever your goals are, we recommend writing them down. Keep your objectives at the forefront of your mind as you’re curating your Store—they’ll help inform your decisions for all of our following advice.

2. Focus on Featured Products
Think of Featured Products as your premium real estate—it’s one of the first things consumers will see when they visit your Store Home. Positioned up top, Featured Products are the first row of four products, within a carousel of up to 12 products.

When it comes to curating your Featured Products, keep your goals and business strategy in mind. You can change the assortment for the appropriate season or promote products that complement each other stylistically—it’s up to you.

Rachel Nanfelt of Alethea and Ruth thinks of the Featured Products section as a sort of mini collection. “There are so many possibilities—a seasonal collection, a specific product collection, a type of art technique,” she says.

“Featured Products” is merely the default language. You may rename the Featured Products title to describe the contents—for example, “My Top Sellers,” “Holiday Gift Ideas,” or in the case of Alethea and Ruth’s Store shown above (at publishing time), “painterly brush strokes.” Keep in mind that the “Featured Products” title must be less than 35 characters, so short and compelling is the name of the game.

The mission of the description located just below your Featured Products title is to provide additional context for the title. “I’ve been doing a lot of painted work lately, so my description highlights a group of pieces that feature brush strokes and painted textures,” Rachel says.

We recommend describing why you’ve chosen to feature these products in your descriptions, and include a maximum of one to two product type keywords where possible. For example:

My photography art collection is inspired by the natural beauty of Mendocino’s beaches and the surrounding redwoods.

3. Keep Your Language Simple
We always encourage creativity at Minted, but we also recommend being simple and straightforward when it comes to communication. Put yourself in the shopper’s shoes as you’re writing language in your “About Yourself” carousel as well as your Featured Products and category titles and descriptions.

When naming your self-launch products, use descriptive and short product names. Minted will then append the product name with the product kind. For example “Coastal Breeze” becomes “Coastal Breeze Photography Art.” Keep in mind that you cannot change the name of your product after it launches.

4. Create Visual Interest
As an artist, you specialize in creating visual interest—it’s the essence of your work, right? The same approach applies for curating your Store. Although your individual creations are super important, so too is the look of your products as a group.

As you’re creating Featured Products and positioning the placement of Other Products, take a step back to look at the products side-by-side. Think about how your colors, styles, and product types complement each other to create an overall look and feel.

What are your visual goals? Are you aiming to show variety? Do you want to create a cohesive look, or do you want a particular product to pop?

5. Curate for the Season
As you’re curating your Store and positioning your work in Featured Products, Other Products, and your various Sections (you can create up to 10 active Sections), optimize for the season. For example, feature Halloween designs and autumn colors in the fall, and winter holidays and themes in November and December.

You can also hide off-season designs when they’re not optimal—for example, Christmas or Hanukkah cards in July.

6. Self-Launch Products
One of the best ways to direct the creative vision of your Store is to self-launch products. If you’re new to Minted and haven’t won a number of design challenges, self-launching products is a great way to increase your product offerings. For that matter, you can also self-launch your non-winning submissions to Design Challenges.

We welcome you to self-launch art, stationery, notebooks, fabric, wrapping paper, and more. Like all Minted products, we take care of manufacturing, order fulfillment, customer service, and shipping. Read our Designer FAQs for more details.

7. Keep Your “Shelves” Fully Stocked
Artist Stores are similar to physical boutiques—they’re most inviting and appealing when their shelves are full. Remember this as you’re creating sections for your various products. We recommend stocking at least four or five products to warrant a section; any less than that appears a bit empty.

If you have only one or two products of a particular category, wait to create a section for them when you have more items to round things out. For example, in Alethea and Ruth’s “holiday” section, she includes a combination of Stationery and Art.

8. Promote Your Specialized Links
Once you’ve created a section, you can create your own marketing campaigns and direct fans to your specialized URL. This is not an actual URL, but to give you an idea, the format would look something like: minted.com/store/artistname/number/whateveryouwant

For example, if you have a “holiday” section, you could promote the products via social media, an e-newsletter, or your personal website or blog.

9. Get a Second (or Third) Opinion
Invite someone who represents your “target market” to test-drive your Store and provide feedback.

10. Experiment and Make Changes
Together we’re just getting started with the new Store design and merchandising tools. And together, we’ll learn about what works well and what doesn’t. As part of the learning process, we recommend experimentation and refreshing your Store sections, Featured Products, and Other Products to see what works best for you.

Rachel says she considers her initial Store creation just the beginning and will likely change her approach often, especially in the featured product section. “I can’t wait to do a Holiday feature section with wrapping paper and gift tags,” she says. “I think it can be a good place to feature some of the smaller coordinating pieces that are for sale but not always in the forefront, like thank-you cards or stickers. I also might use it as a place to feature my newest work for sale on the site—there are so many possibilities.”

What are your thoughts, questions, and advice for curating a Minted Artist Store? Share your feedback in Comments below.


MORE RESOURCES
Designer FAQs: How can I merchandise my Store?
Minted’s 7 Tips for Creating a Unique Artist Brand” featuring advice from artist Melanie Severin
The Essential Checklist for Minted Artist Stores

ABOUT MINTED ARTIST STORES
Ready to grow to the next level? Once you’ve won a Minted Design Challenge, you’re invited to create your own branded Store. Artist Stores allow you to use Minted’s world-class manufacturing and fulfillment platform to run your business. You can self-launch non-custom products to your Store, and we handle the printing, shipping, and customer service. Learn more here.

Published September 24, 2015 • Learn how to become a Minted artist here.

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When you need a quick creative pick-me-up, what do you do?

Creative funks happen to the best of us, but overcoming them oftentimes inspires a whole new direction. Here, Minted artists Joni Tyrrell, Andi Pahl, and Jennifer Postorino share their most reliable creative pick-me-ups.

Joni Tyrrell with her son, Kingston

Joni Tyrrell
North Liberty, Iowa

Take a break! It’s so easy as a creative business owner to get caught up in working all the time and forgetting to find balance between work and family life. I’m just starting to figure out a balance, and I find that when I turn to the two most important people in my life—my husband and son—that downtime can really trigger a creative thought or idea and I can come back to “work” feeling refreshed and excited about new things.

Joni with her dog, Maverick (“A female with a boy name,” she says.)

Pining for Pineapple by Joni Tyrrell


Andi Pahl
Columbus, Ohio

Music—from show tunes to ’80s pop to Jenny Lewis and everything in between—is a great creative pick-me-up. I also enjoy taking ballet classes, so whether it’s an hour-long class or a short plié relevé combination in my living room to get the blood pumping, working out can be very helpful.

One of my favorite creative pick-me-ups is coffee and collaborating with a creative friend, like Alaina from Cheer Up Press. Since inspiration seems to hit me at the most random times, I keep several journals. When I’m at a total loss for ideas, I consult one of my journals for creative inspiration. There’s always a surprising idea that I wrote down at some earlier point and forgot about later. When all else fails, I just start painting or sketching without any prior plan or expectations.

I’m Frond Of You No. 2” by Andi Pahl

Reflections Watercolor by Andi Pahl


Jenny Postorino and her daughter, Quinn. Photo by Ashley Mauro Photography

Jennifer Postorino
Dayton, Ohio

It’s pretty simple for me. I just walk away from whatever I am doing and see what’s going on in the world around me. I’ll run to grab an iced coffee from Starbucks or a sweet treat from our local bakery—I’m a total sucker for iced sugar cookies and cupcakes! Lately I’ve been hitting the gym for a butt-kicking crossfit session every day (which is my newest obsession, or necessity, based on my love of cookies).

But, honestly, most of the time I find myself just hanging out with my two kiddos, being a typical mom. The things that come out of their little mouths crack me up, and I find inspiration in them every day. It could be anything from hearing my 3-year-old sing Pharrell Williams’ “Happy” in the car at the top of her lungs to playing outside and listening to my son ramble on about how he thinks he has a huge head while shooting hoops. Oddly enough, it’s in those little moments when creativity strikes, and I feel recharged again and ready to work.

Glimmer” by Jennifer Postorino

Bundle of Joy” by Jennifer Postorino


What do you do when you need a quick creative pick-me-up? Share your answer in Comments below and on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter with the hashtag #WhatInspiresMe.

How does education—formal and informal—shape your creative work? Read about Minted artists’ experiences here.

Learn how to become a Minted artist here.

Published September 14, 2015

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How Has Education Inspired Your Creativity?

Back-to-school season has got us thinking about how education inspires creativity. For this edition of #WhatInspiresMe, Minted artists Taleen Bedikian, Lori James, and Kaydi Bishop think back to their college days.

Taleen Bedikian
Torrance, California

“I love being surrounded by creative thinkers and even non-creatives who question the whole. When I was first majoring in Fine Art, my professor opened my eyes to the idea of gestalt, reminding me to step back and really look at what I am seeing. It’s the whole that we see that really moves us. Having learned this, I like to test myself when tackling projects, which usually means tilting my head, squinting, or backing up to assure that my work feels good as a whole. It’s just something that has stuck with me through the years, and I like to think it helps.”

Lounge-1” by TRB Design

There’s Always Hope” by TRB Design


Lori James of guess what?
Honolulu, Hawaii

“At Honolulu Community College, I had a very inspiring professor named Harrison ‘Bud’ Brooks who really spurred my passion for design. He stressed the importance of knowing the basics and instilled an ethic of discipline and hard work. He challenged us to seek out good design and analyze the underlying elements—composition, layout, typography, etc.—to understand what made it successful. He also taught us never to be complacent, but to continue to learn and grow and evolve as artists. Mr. Brooks definitely had a huge impact on who I am as a designer, and I’m so thankful to have had him as a mentor.”

Petit Monsieur” by guess what?

Snow Time Like the Holidays” by guess what?


Kaydi Bishop
San Francisco

“With a background in interior design and architecture, I find myself inevitably inspired by everything from the uncommon moulding detail to ancient tile patterns. In college, I had the opportunity to study in Florence, Italy, consequently studying many of these details first hand. After college, I was fortunate to travel throughout Asia and the Mid East for my job. Everywhere I turned, I found myself photographing inspiring patterns, materials, color combinations, etc. The education I receive from traveling continues to serve as my main source of inspiration to this day.”

Brushed Casablanca” pillow by Kaydi Bishop

The Half Shell” by Kaydi Bishop


How has—or does—learning and education inspire your creativity? Share your answer in Comments below and on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter with the hashtag #WhatInspiresMe.

#WhatInspiresMe is published every other Monday. This is the fourth edition; read the third edition here.

Published August 31, 2015 • Learn how to become a Minted artist here.

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Minted’s 7 Tips for Creating a Unique Artist Brand

One of the coolest aspects of personal branding is that it’s entirely up to you. “Artist branding is a very personal thing and should be a true reflection of you as an artist, which really is a reflection of yourself,” says Melanie Severin, a Minted artist from Alberta, Canada.

The digital world (and even traditional sources) is your oyster when it comes to sharing and experimenting with your brand identity. Instagram, Facebook, Tumblr in addition to business cards and event promo materials are great channels for telling your story and connecting with a local or global audience.

If you have a Minted Artist Store, you have a number of ways to curate your persona—via your product assortment, cover image, and the “About Yourself” bio and carousel of up to five 1420 pixel x 640 pixel photographs.

Before you dive into updating your Artist Store and other marketing content, consider our advice for developing your brand identity.

1. Define Your Brand
If you had to describe the meaning and style of your work in a handful of words and visuals, what comes to mind? Think about these words and visual references as you’re developing copy and photos that best represent you.

Like many artists, Melanie says she’s constantly evolving and growing, but a mix of sophistication and whimsy is the consistent theme in her work. Part of Melanie’s brand includes her personal life—her rural home-based studio, being a mom of three young children (who raise chickens!). “And the fact that I live in Canada and am heavily inspired by nature,” she says.

Melanie’s artistic style varies widely in terms of the different media, color palettes, and disciplines she works in, so it doesn’t make sense for her to show only a limited palette or style in her branding imagery. “But for some, that works very well, and in fact I’ve seen some absolutely stunning Instagram feeds built on a very limited palette or style,” she says.

2. Get the Lighting Just Right
“Great lighting is everything,” Melanie says, and we couldn’t agree more. But this doesn’t necessarily mean you have to overspend on lighting equipment.

Perhaps you want your photos to be shot primarily indoors with natural light, or maybe a cloudy outdoor setting perfectly captures your mood and style. Like we said—it’s up to you! Read our DIY photography tips in “10 Tips for Taking Great Photos for Your Artist Store.”

3. Shoot For the Appropriate Format
The 1420 pixel x 640 pixel dimensions of the Minted Store “About Yourself” photo carousel are long and lean—the opposite of, say, Instagram’s square photos. When planning and styling your photographs, take a step back and leave space to crop in a way that will look best in the long landscape format.

4. Focus on Quality Over Quantity
If you don’t have five great images for your About You Carousel, don’t upload five images. In other words, focus on quality over quantity. Because photography reflects consumers’ impressions of your work, Melanie says, “definitely don’t feature any photos that are poor quality, grainy, or out of focus.”

If you’re taking your own photos, we recommend investing in or borrowing a decent camera. You could also do a “trade” with another Minted artist or photographer—you take his or her portraits in exchange for him or her taking your portraits.

Melanie takes most of her own brand photographs, but a fellow Minted artist, Ardell McLennan, also has taken some of the photos in Melanie’s Minted carousel and Instagram feed. “I recommend working with a photographer occasionally for portraits,” she says. “It’s pretty difficult to get good photos of yourself, in your workspace, and in the process of creating.”


5. Mix It Up
What’s unique about you as an artist? Convey your personality and what makes you stand out with a variety of shots. “Consider what it is about your style and process that might be really interesting and different from others and think of creative ways to capture that in a photograph,” Melanie says.

For the Minted Store About You carousel, we recommend artists show at least one portrait in their creative environment or places that represent their “artist brand,” in addition to at least one photo that depicts their creative process, and styled product shots.

6. Tell Your Story
“People want to know what inspires you, what your typical workday is like, how and where you create. All of these things become part of your ‘brand,’ in addition to the overall style of the products you create,” Melanie says.

Social media and the Artist Store photo carousel are great ways to share not only beautiful styled images of your products, but also your day-to-day adventures. Melanie’s biggest goal is to “be herself” and give followers and customers a glimpse into her life and inspirations—and sometimes that’s portrayed with a sense of humor.

“One of my absolute favorite photos in my Instagram feed is of our daughter when she came into my studio dressed as Darth Vader,” Melanie says. “It was a priceless moment that embodies what it’s like for creatives who work from home with children. Sharing these real-life moments with your followers helps connect you with them and makes your work that much more meaningful.”

7. Write in First-Person Voice
Let the world know it’s you behind your messaging by writing in first-person voice. For example, in your About You bio on your Minted Store, you could write something like, “I’ve traveled and surfed the world over, and my work reflects my adventures.”


Curious about Minted Stores? Artists who win Minted Design Challenges are invited to open their own store. Read more in our FAQs.

About the Author: Amy Schroeder, Minted’s Community Content Manager, founded Venus, the magazine about women in the arts and DIY culture, and has written for Etsy, West Elm, and NYLON. Connect on Instagram @thevenuslady.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Published August 28, 2015 • Learn how to become a Minted artist here.

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10 Tips for Critiquing Minted Art and Designs

The Minted community is about paying it forward in more ways than one, and because feedback is so critical to the creative process, we award Critique Awards to artists who provide quality feedback on other artists’ submissions. Each Challenge Home has a “Most Constructive” leaderboard, where we track the community members who have received the most “Constructive” votes for their critiques.

Curious about what’s considered the best way to provide and receive helpful feedback? We’ve compiled the following tips, with the help of seasoned Minted artists.

Mad About Pencils by Olive and Me Studios

Mad About Pencils by Olive and Me Studios

1. Be Specific
When asking for feedback on your submission page, don’t be vague by asking questions such as “Do you like this?” or “What do you think?” Instead, focus on specific points such as color, style and fonts. “If you feel something is not working in your design, you should have some idea where the problem is,” says longtime Minted artist Phrosné Ras. “For example, ask something like, ‘Do you think the script font is working as the heading or should I use sans serif?’”

Same goes for providing feedback to others—aim to be the opposite of ambiguous. Thoughtful observations and pointed suggestions for improvement are more helpful than saying, “I don’t love it.” And keep in mind that basic pointers mean a lot to new designers.

2. Start a Poll
Minted artists are busy during challenges, so a quick way to give and get feedback is to start a Design Poll, which allows artists to upload up to four versions of a design, and invite others to rate each version. You’ll receive the feedback below your design in the Comments section.

“Giving someone a broad critique of their work takes a lot of time,” says Jill Ellis. “But helping them choose one typeface over the other or vertical vs. landscape or red vs. green in a poll—that’s much more manageable.”

In the above poll comments, Kelly Schmidt shares her poll pick and critique of Simona Cavallaro’s award-winning “Bold Dots” design. “While the feedback is all positive, I like that Kelly explained the reasons why she chose this,” Simona says. “The fact that she pointed out ‘hey baby’ is more unique than ‘oh baby’ solidified my decision to use it. I like to do things differently than the crowd, so this feedback helped me feel more confident about that.”

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Introducing: New Minted Mentors!

This is a very exciting time of the year for Minted. With the launch of the 2011 Minted holiday assortment fast approaching and a huge wedding design challenge on the horizon, we thought this was an excellent point to select three additional Minted designers to join Amy Ehmann of Design Lotus and Sydney Newsom as Minted Mentors! It is my great pleasure to announce that Ann Gardner, Hailey Myziuk of Hello Hailey and Jennifer Wick will be joining the Mentor team. We feel very lucky to have these inspiring ladies as part of the community and feel their shift into officially guiding, engaging and informing their fellow Minties is a completely natural one. In the weeks and months that follow, our community has a lot to look forward to. The Minted Mentors will be kicking off fun, interesting and informative threads in the Forum, connecting designers with the resources they need to participate in design challenges and making sure that Minted receives the feedback we need to constantly improve the community and customer experience. Newbies take note; these are the ladies you want to chat with.

Ann Gardner was Minted in February of 2010. Not only does she have a ton of well-deserved wins under her belt, including three first place prizes, Ann has also been extremely active in the challenges by voting and commenting on her fellow Minties’ designs. Ann doesn’t just create incredible paper creations either; she’s also a formally trained pastry chef. You can see some of her gorgeous edible creations and learn more about this Minted Mentor here.

Hailey Myziuk of Hello Hailey was Minted in March of 2010. It’s been wonderful to see Hailey’s warmth and personality shine through so many of her winning designs. Her bubbly personality also comes through while she’s actively commenting on submissions and threads in the Forum. When Hailey isn’t creating beautiful designs for Minted, she freelance designs for some amazing causes and created illustrations for an adorable children’s book called ‘Daddy Can You.’ See more of Hailey’s work and learn more about her here.

Jennifer Wick was Minted in September of 2010. Happy first anniversary of being a Mintie Jen! We’re so pleased to have Jen as part of the Mentor team as her enthusiasm and energy are contagious. Her big wins in a variety of categories, coupled with the thoughtful comments she leaves on design submissions and in threads in the forum have made her such an asset to the community. Find out more about Jen and her budding design business here.

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Meet a Mintie: Sydney Newsom

Our Meet a Mintie today hails from Alabama and is known for her Southern charm, wonderfully sarcastic sense of humor and the lightness she injects into forum conversations, as well as her design style, which ranges from whimsical to preppy.  It’s no surprise then that Sydney has been overwhelmingly nominated by her fellow designers as our next Minted Mentor, a role she’ll share with Design Lotus. This is our way of giving Sydney a cyber-high five to recognize her leadership, friendliness, and overall awesomeness.  Congratulations Sydney!

How did your design career begin?

I began the job I have now as the marketing coordinator for an architecture and engineering firm (given to me with a giant leap of faith that my creativity would teach me everything I needed to know

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Meet a Mintie: Design Lotus

With her trademark smile and effervescent energy, creativity, and passion, this designer is known by many. Some people call her Design Lotus, while others refer to her as the mayor of the Minted forum who coined the term “Minties.” We simply know her as Amy, the rock star designer and mom of three who has shown over and over again that she is a force to be reckoned with. Fair warning: As if it weren’t enough that she is tirelessly enthusiastic, generous with her knowledge and opinions, and always hilarious, her kids are really, really adorable. Keep reading to see for yourself.

Amy + Gavin

Everyone who encounters your energy and spirit must wonder: How on earth do you juggle three children and a bustling design career?

Bustling design career?  Are you talking to me?  Distractions are my life right now and Minted is my joyous outlet.  When everyone is finally fed, clothed, and happy… it’s mommy’s time to “play!”  It’s usually not until after the kids are fast asleep that I am REALLY able to think and/or brainstorm.

"Melonball" from the Be Mine Valentine Challenge

"Chef's Notes" from the Keep In Touch Good Housekeeping Challenge

How did you get your start in graphic design?

I stumbled into it while I was working as a training/event coordinator. I took some initiative to create some name badges, table tents, and signage for several training events. They were a hit with the client, and hence, launched my career in the design field.  I discovered Lynda Weinman’s H.O.T. books, which were fantastic, and I’ve been hooked on her training material ever since.  In fact, I have learned every software I know through lynda.com.

Where did the name “design lotus” come from?

The lotus flower has many layers and petals as do my design aesthetics. Also lotus tattoos are meant to represent life, new beginnings and the possibility of people growing to change into something of beauty. I would like to believe I can do the same for my clients through design – by taking something from a murky/chaotic start and transforming it into something to celebrate.

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