5 etiquette guidelines for traditional wedding invitations

Written by Jackie Mangiolino

When it comes to formal, traditional wedding invitations, there are entire books written on etiquette, and I’ve read nearly all of them. As a traditional invitation designer and etiquette lover, it’s my job to know every obscure rule in the book.

However, as a couple planning to get married, you may be more focused on the look of your invitation, than on hidden code within the wording. But proper, formal invitation etiquette will tell the story of your wedding, so it’s important not to make a major faux pas. I mean, the invitation is the first thing a guest sees, so let’s leave a good impression, right?

Here are my top five etiquette guidelines and tips for creating successful traditional wedding invitations.

View The Anatomy of a Wedding Invitation in closer view here on the Minted Wedding Planning Guide.

1. Check the spelling.

Spelling mistakes are by far the absolute biggest, and most common, mistake I see. It’s also a costly mistake to have to fix (not to mention, embarrassing). As a designer, the fonts we work with are often not compatible with spell-check software. Without the ability to run a spell-check, it is important for couples to carefully proofread their invitations before printing. At the end of the day, it’s the couple’s responsibility to check for all spelling, especially details, such as the spelling of their names, family member names, and key information, like the time, date, or location.

“Fashion District” wedding invitation by Jill Means

2. Position the bride’s name first—unless there are two grooms.

As with most etiquette traditions, this stems from when the bride’s family hosted the wedding, and thus invited guests to witness the marriage of their daughter and her future husband. While hosting norms (and who pays) have evolved over the years, it’s still standard for the bride to be first on the invitation, and for her initial to be on the left/first for monograms. Of course, if you’re having a same-sex wedding, this rule can happily be thrown out the window, and you and your partner will decide which of you will be first.

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Minted Artists in the Press February 2019

Congratulations to Minted artists who are featured on The View, Buzzfeed, and more. Join the fun of spotting Minted artists in the press by uploading PR clips on your social media with the hashtag #mintiespotting.


The View
(February 5, 2019)

Featuring “Minimalist Quote” Keepsake Square by Phrosné Ras, “Where The Heart Is” Custom Art by Annie Clark, classroom valentines “Valentine Floss Boss” by Baumbirdy, “For the Record” by Robert and Stella, “Photo Fun” by Jessie Steury, “Five Stars” by Sarah Cohn, “More Than Tacos” by Erin L. Wilson, “A Pawsome Valentine” by Sovelle, and “Hedgehugs” by Erica Krystek



The Knot
(Spring 2019)

“Refined Desert” featuring “Gallery Abstract Art” invitations by Alethea and Ruth and “Joyfully Ever After” place cards by Faiths Designs



Buzzfeed
 (February 2, 2019)

18 Websites You Can Easily Shop for Valentine’s Day Cards” featuring “Little Octopus” by Karidy Walker and “More Than Coffee” by Lehan Veenker Valentine’s Day Greeting Cards

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Minted gives a first look at innovative designs at NSS 2019

Minted was pretty in pink and pampas grass for the annual Community Cocktail Party, at Mercantile 37, located at 517 W. 37th Street in New York. “Mountain Range” removable wall mural by Sadie Holden.

Styling by Natasha M. Lawler of NML PR. Photos by Sara Wight

If 2018 was a yearlong celebration of Minted’s 10th anniversary, 2019 has already ignited a celebration of Minted’s decade ahead. At least, that was one of the underlying themes of Minted events at this year’s National Stationery Show (NSS) in New York, held February 3–6 at the Javits Center.

Like years past, Minted artists traveled near and far to attend the four-day tradeshow described as “the place for all things paper.” Petra Kern and Maria Murphy of Lulaloo flew thousands of miles from their respective homes in Slovenia and Switzerland, Afton Harding of Clara Jean Design and her mother Shauna Little traveled from Utah, and Mansi Verma made a jaunt from New Jersey.

What made this year’s NSS different compared to previous years? Firstly, the date change—from the traditional May to February, which brought surprisingly warm temperatures for New York. For Minted artist Kim Dietrich Elam, who’s attended NSS five times, the 2019 show seemed smaller in comparison, but just as entertaining and exhilarating. “Minted’s booth featured beautiful fabric swatches by the artist community and was super Instagram-able, as always,” she says. “And the free wine tasting throughout Javits was a fun addition.” Kim said one of the trends among show vendors that “spoke most to her” was the use of witty and irreverent sayings on a wide range of stationery and gift products.

During the Minted Community Cocktail party on February 4, Minted Founder and CEO Mariam Naficy reflected on 2018 highlights, such as the transition to monthly artist commission payments and the development of All-In-One cards. She also shared exciting news about 2019; namely, that plans are in the works for the second Camp Minted, scheduled to take place July 29–31, 2019, in Las Vegas.

Here’s a recap of our whirlwind, action-packed NSS 2019 experience of exhibiting at the show, hosting artists Jordan Sondler and Aspacia Kusulas at the Minted booth, and celebrating with artists at the annual Community Cocktail party.

The Minted Booth at National Stationery Show 2019

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